Picker Pals

We are delighted to be involved in Picker Pals an innovative primary school programme inspiring and equipping children to become the next generation of environmentalists by leading their families on local litter-picking adventures.

Bug Hotel

At Togher N.S. we appreciate the diversity of nature and for this reason the children in the Junior Room have created a bug hotel to create a space where the bugs can thrive.

A bug hotel is part garden art and part winter habitat for insects. Our bug hotel will provide a home for a diversity of insects. Our insects will have all sorts of different nesting needs so the children provided a variety of plant material to encourage all sorts of our creepy crawly friends to lodge.

Our Bug Hotel will give a helping hand to local wildlife and are a great way to repay our insect friends for all their help in the garden throughout the year. Often known as “gardener’s friends,” these beneficial insects can be very useful by offering a form of natural pest control and flower pollination.

 

Picker Pals

The children in the Junior Room have been selected to participate in the new Picker Pals programme launched by the environmental charity VOICE Ireland. Picker Pals inspires and motivates primary school children and their families to become the next generation of environmentalists through litter picking in their local areas. Each child will be given the opportunity to take home the Picker Pal kit for a weekend. The family can then go on a litter picking adventure in their local area with each child reporting back to their classmates.

Autumn Nature Walk

The children in our First and Second Classes have been busy exploring our local habitats. As well as looking beautiful, berries, fruits, nuts and cones contain the seeds of a plant and are therefore crucial for the cycle of life. Seed dispersal was discussed and samples were collected. These samples were displayed by the children in their lovely autumn nature booklets.

 

Our Local Stream – Scientific Study

The children were delighted to identify a wide variety of mini-beasts in our local stream as they are a sign of healthy and clean water. It was now time for the science bit! Stephanie from the Heritage Council showed the children how to test our water samples with litmus paper. Our visual observations were confirmed when these tests showed minimal traces of nitrates.

 

 

Not all carrots are orange!

Years ago carrots used to come in a wide variety of colours from white to bright yellow and deep purple. Around the 16th century the Dutch began developing the orange variety so common today. This year our vegetable garden was planted with an emphasis on biodiversity. It was time to harvest and taste these interesting carrots.